Tag Archives: Barbecue

Grilled Octopus

Easier than I ever imagined.
8 legs but the servings vary according to appetites and the size of the octopus
Shopping List

1 octopus, 1.5 to 2 pounds (see note)

1 onion

2 garlic cloves

1 bay leaf

1 tsp dried oregano (or alternate herbs)

1 large or 2 small lemons

1/4 cup olive oil

Purchase

  • 1  octopus (11/2 to 2 pounds), cleaned

Note: A larger octopus will work, just make sure it fits in your pressure cooker and adjust the cooking time. I’ve also cooked 2 11/2 pound octopuses at once in my 6-quart pressure cooker.

When you (or the fishmonger) clean the octopus, be sure to remove the beak, eyes and open the head and clean it out. Rinse the octopus, especially inside the head as there might be a little sand in there if it isn’t cleaned out thoroughly.

Place the octopus in a pressure cooker. Add water to cover and

  • 1 onion, cut in half
  • 2 cloves garlic, split or smashed
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 tsp salt

ATTN Be absolutely certain you don’t overfill your pressure cooker!

Bring the pressure cooker to high (15 lbs) pressure. Set a timer for 15 minutes. When the time is done, bring the pressure down quickly and check that a paring knife easily slips into the thickest part of the leg.  If not, close the pressure cooker, bring it back to pressure and cook for 3 minutes; then re-test it. Generally I have found that 15 minutes is enough time.

In a 2-3 quart mixing bowl, combine

  • juice of 2 small or 1 large lemon
  • 3 to 4 TBL olive oil
  • 1 tsp dried oregano, marjoram or thyme. (You can also use fresh herbs if you prefer)
  • 1/2 tsp salt

Add the cooked octopus and refrigerate for at least 3 hours, turning the octopus at least once in the marinade but more often if time allows.

Light coals or light gas grill. Grill the octopus whole, making sure you don’t char the tips of the legs too much. When it’s gotten some color, it’s done. Remember, it was fully cooked when it came out of the pressure cooker.

Serve, either cut into legs or bite-size bits, drizzled with more olive oil, salt, pepper, lemon juice or your favorite condiments.

 

Chicken Tikka

Traditionally made as kebabs, this version uses chicken pieces.
4 servings
Shopping List

2-inch piece of ginger

4 cloves of garlic

2 habanero chilis (or 1 jalapeño if you want a milder dish)

1/2 cup whole-milk yogurt

1 tsp salt

1 tsp Kashmiri chili powder (or paprika)

3/4 tsp hot chili powder

1/2 tsp ground turmeric

1/2 tsp ground cumin

3/4 tsp granulated sugar

1 tsp garam masala

2 pounds skin-on, bone-in chicken pieces

In a blender, combine

  • 2-inch piece of ginger, peeled and sliced into coins
  • 4 cloves of garlic, peeled
  • 2 habanero chilis, stem removed seeds left in (or a jalapeño if you want a milder dish)
  • 1/2 cup whole-milk yogurt
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp Kashmiri chili powder (or paprika)
  • 1/4 to 3/4 tsp hot chili powder
  • 1/2 tsp ground turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin
  • 3/4 tsp granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp garam masala (or use a substitution, below)

Run the blender until a smooth paste forms, adding a tiny bit of water if needed to get it moving.

Trim excess fat from

  • 2 pounds skin-on, bone-in chicken pieces

I’m partial to thighs, but any pieces can work. Large breasts, if used should be cut in half.

Combine the chicken and paste, mixing thoroughly. Refrigerate for for at least 4 hours. Cook on a grill, starting with the skin side up; indirect heat is better. Flip to finish cooking the skin side. (I haven’t cooked this in the oven, this but it should cook for 30-40 minutes at 425º F on a tray.)

Note that if you don’t have garam masala you can make a mixture of the following spices, ATTN using more of the earlier ones on the list and less of the later ones. Everyone’s idea of what’s in this spice mix is different so look around on the web, and if you don’t have one of the ingredients listed,  just omit it and fill in with the others: (all are ground herbs)  coriander, cumin, cardamom, black pepper, cinnamon, cloves.

 

Jerk Chicken

This is a recipe that really demands cooking on the grill with a source of smoke, such as wood chips. It’s probably good cooked in the oven, but it won’t be the same. Note that it’s pretty spicy, but you can tone it down by reducing the number of hot peppers or substituting milder peppers such as jalapeños.

In the jar of a blender (or food processor), measure the following:

  • 6 scallions, cut into 4″ pieces
  • 1 large or 2 medium shallots, peeled
  • 3-4 habanero or Scotch bonnet chilies, stems removed but the seeds left in.
  • 3-4 cloves of garlic
  • 11/2 inch piece of ginger, peeled and cut into slices across the grain
  • 2 tsp dried thyme
  • 1 heaping TBL ground allspice
  • 1 generous TBL soy sauce
  • 1 heaping TBL brown sugar
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp ground black pepper
  • 2 tsp cider or white vinegar
  • 1/3 cup vegetable oil

Run blender until a smooth paste forms. If you taste it at this point, just be aware that it’s very concentrated and the flavors will soften somewhat when it’s on the chicken and cooked.

Trim excess fat from

  • 1 whole chicken, cut into quarters or 8-10 chicken thighs or 4-6 leg quarters

The amount of chicken the paste will service will vary with the surface area of the parts. Spread it around on all the outside surfaces and put the chicken in a bowl or zipper-sealable bag, and refrigerate for 18-36 hours.

When you’re ready to cook the chicken, set up the grill and be sure to have soaked some kind of wood for smoke. I love hickory chips, but you might prefer something else. You’ll need enough fuel to cook the chicken for up to 45 minutes. If you’re using coal,  arrange them for indirect heat or cook at/under 300 if you’re using gas.  Make sure you have a lot of smoke going and place the chicken skin side up, cover the grill and let it cook for 25-30 minutes. Keep an eye on it just to make sure you don’t have any flare-ups. The chicken will be a lovely color at this point. Turn the chicken over and cook for another 10 minutes. Start to check whether the chicken is cooked through. The timing will vary depending on the thickness of the meat and the temperature of the grill. The chicken is going to be dark (not burnt) on the outside when it’s fully cooked.

 

Herb-Garlic Marinade

Great for any grilled meat

Combine

  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon dried marjoram or oregano
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper

Place mixture and chicken, duck or other meat in a zippered plastic bag. Eliminate any air in the bag. My favorite way to do this is as follows: leaving the bag open and being careful not to get any water into the bag, immerse the bag into a sink full of cold water, helping any pockets of air that may form in the lower part to escape. When all of the air is out of the bag, seal it before removing from the water.

Put the bag in the refrigerator for at least 6 hours, or overnight, flipping the bag at east once in the process.

I’ve used this on a boneless leg of lamb I grilled on a rotisserie. Outstanding!